15-second ad spots preferred for online video: study

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A new survey from Advertising.com Inc. found that nearly 66 percent of respondents view streaming video content at least once a week.

Forty-four percent of these video viewers are ages 18-34 and the rest 35 and older, according to the Baltimore-based company that is part of Time Warner Inc.

The younger audience is likelier to watch television episodes online, create their own video content and forward video clips to friends. They also like to stream entertainment content such as music videos, TV shows and movie trailers.

Those respondents over 35 are likelier to view news and sports clips online, Advertising.com said.

News and entertainment are the overall top choices for online video streamers.

In terms of online video advertising, the survey found that 15-second spots are preferred over TV-length ads. They also perform better. Endplay rates for 15-second spots are 20 percent higher than 30-second spots.

Also, when asked what would make video advertising more pleasurable, 66 percent of consumers ranked "shorter ads than television" as the No. 1 factor. This proves that not all the offline rules apply online, according to Advertising.com.

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